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Archived Audio Webcast
Originally broadcast live on January 14, 2005
NEW TSUNAMI WARNING SYSTEM TO PROTECT ALL OF THE UNITED STATES
Expanded System to Protect U.S. Atlantic Coast and Caribbean

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) outlined plans to expand the current Pacific Tsunami Warning System and build a new tsunami warning system for the Atlantic coast of the United States and the Carribean. The NOAA Pacific Tsunami Warning System currently benefits 26 member nations in the Pacific Basin. The new system to be built for the Atlantic and Caribbean also will benefit other nations if they choose to receive the bulletins and warnings for the deadly waves. The U.S. Geological Survey will put seismic sensors in these new areas as part of the Atlantic and Caribbean tsunami warning system.

Participants:
John H. Marburger, III
, Science Adviser to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy
Retired Navy Vice Adm. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., NOAA Administrator and Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
P. Patrick Leahy, U.S. Geological Survey, associate director for geology
Arden L. Bement, Jr., Director, National Science Foundation


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Publication of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce.
Last Updated: January 14, 2005 1:10 PM
http://www.noaa.gov